Quantcast

Modern life and design in our historical American Foursquare home

Subscribe to get new posts instantly by email:


Posts Tagged “staining”

A DIY Ikea Tarva dresser for our modern kid

By on April 23, 2015


Last week, we talked about moving our treasured family nursery dresser into Baby T’s room, and shared our DIY plans to design a modern furniture look with the Ikea Tarva three-drawer dresser in Toddler E’s big-girl bedroom. Using dark wood stain and white paint, we wanted to create a sophisticated but classic design that would be timeless, and work with E’s evolving style and functionality needs over the next several years. (You can see some of our inspiration images for this project on our Pinterest board!)

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

So after buying the Tarva and bringing it home, we unpacked the individual dresser parts and set them up in our garage. John took on most of the work for this particular DIY furniture project (while I was busy painting the fabric drawers for the nursery), and he wanted to stain and paint the dresser parts in their unassembled state before putting the final piece together.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

For the stain, we decided to try Minwax Polyshades. It’s got a built-in polyurethane coat to protect and make the surface more durable, which eliminates the need for a separate topcoat. Traditionally, wood staining involves rubbing the stain onto the surface with a soft cloth, wiping off any excess, and ending with a protective finish. But with a combination stain-polyurethane formula like Polyshades, you apply thin coats with a brush and let them dry without wiping off. We’d never used this one-step product before, but it sounded convenient and potentially time-saving. So we went ahead and bought a quart of the Espresso Satin finish, a nice dark color that looked like it would match the toddler’s bed frame. (According to the label, one quart covers 120-150 square feet – plenty for our little dresser project.)

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

To paint the drawer fronts, we wanted a soft paint color that would work well with the warm tones in the toddler’s bedroom. In order to keep our DIY costs low and stay within our total budget of $100, we surveyed our “leftover from previous projects” paint arsenal, and chose Swiss Coffee by Behr, a nice clean shade that’s bright but not blinding white.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

With the materials assembled and the dresser pieces spread out and ready, John got to work. First, he focused on the parts to be stained: the dresser’s top, sides, legs and knobs. In order to get complete stain coverage on the small legs and knobs without touching them and making fingerprints during the staining process, he attached them to larger pieces of scrap wood. Then he sanded all the wood surfaces lightly and wiped them clean.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

Next, he used a foam brush to apply wood conditioner to the unfinished pieces – an important pre-staining step that properly prepares the wood surface and helps the grain open up to absorb stain more evenly.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

As you can see below, this really makes a difference when working with a soft wood variety like the Tarva’s white pine.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

Once the wood conditioner was dry, John used a natural bristle brush to “paint” the Polyshades stain onto the conditioned wood in the direction of the grain.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

Knowing he wouldn’t be able to wipe off any excess stain, John was careful to use long even brushstrokes. But he still found it difficult to cover the surfaces with a uniform layer of stain. Applying too much pressure on the brush created a thin streaky coat that let the bare wood show through more than we wanted. On the other hand, brushing with a lighter touch tended to deposit uneven patches of stain across the wood. It was a lot of trial and error to find a technique that worked – and even then, we weren’t able to eliminate every single brush mark.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

The Espresso color was also not quite as dark as we wanted yet, which meant we’d need another coat of stain. So John left the first coat to dry for several hours, and in the meantime he moved on to painting the drawer fronts. For these, we wanted solid paint coverage that would still allow the texture of the wood grain to show through, something we knew we could achieve by doing multiple thinner layers of paint instead of one thick coat.

John brushed the first coat of Swiss Coffee on the three drawer fronts, thin enough that the knots in the pine were still visible.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

With the first paint coat on the drawer fronts, John jumped back to the stained pieces (now dry), sanded them lightly, and wiped off the residue to prepare for another coat of Polyshades. The first coat still looked a little streaky, and we hoped that the second coat would be dark enough to camouflage the imperfections. But even though John had sanded between coats to give the surface better adhesion, the glossy polyurethane in the first coat still made it difficult to get a continuous finish with the second coat. He had to brush the stain on lightly to keep it from pooling, and it turned out to be even more tricky to apply than the first coat.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

After finishing the second stain coat, John switched back again to the painted drawer fronts (also now dry), sanded them lightly, and painted on a second thin coat of Swiss Coffee. When that dried, he painted a third and final coat. Then he left both the stained and painted dresser pieces to dry overnight.

The next day, we brought everything up to E’s bedroom, and she and John went to work assembling the dresser.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

And here’s the finished piece!

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

The dark stain with white drawers is a classic look with a modern twist – and just as we hoped, it fits perfectly with her decor without looking babyish or cutesy.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

We love how this custom-finished dresser came out, and so does Toddler E. It’s the perfect size for her – she can reach all the drawers and pick out her own clothes each morning.

A DIY Ikea Tarva Dresser for our Modern Kid | RatherSquare.com

But would we use the Polyshades stain again? The pros: its Espresso color does look deep and rich, the streaks from the brushstrokes aren’t too noticeable, and the surface is well sealed and protected. The cons: it was a LOT trickier to apply than we thought it would be, and while it did save John the extra step of adding a separate protective topcoat, there was definitely a trade-off of extra effort and time as he attempted to create a smooth finish. So… we’re not sure if we’ll use this stain-plus-polyurethane product again, and we may go back to the traditional stain method for our next wood staining project.

But in the end, we’re very happy with our DIY kid-friendly Tarva project! And hopefully Toddler E will be using this dresser for many years to come.

We’re curious – have you ever used Polyshades before? What was your experience with it? Do you have any helpful tips or stories?

(linked on Miss Mustard Seed and Thrifty Decor Chick and Remodelaholic)

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

April 23, 2015